Comparative social research

Two key factors are space and time. The Cross-National Research Group The Cross-National Research Group was established in with the aim of providing a forum for discussion and exchange of ideas and experience between researchers from different social science disciplines engaged in cross-national comparative studies, for those planning to embark on cross-national projects and for policy-makers interested in exploiting the findings from international studies.

As a rule, the articles present two or more cases for comparison, be they nations, regions, organizations, or social units at different points of time. This technique often utilizes multiple disciplines in one study.

Comparative social research the high esteem for intellectual activity gave rise to a genuine curiosity about other cultures — which has lain thereafter at the heart of comparative inquiry. Information technology has enabled greater production of quantitative data for comparison, and international communications technology has facilitated this information to be easily spread.

These problems are compounded when comparisons are based on secondary analysis of existing national datasets, Comparative social research it may not always be possible to apply agreed criteria uniformly.

The societal approach, which has perhaps been Comparative social research fully explicated in relation to industrial sociology Maurice et al.

Similarly, questioning of the Greek laws and institutions and its related values and practices e. Approaches to cross-national research For the purposes of this article, a study is held to be cross-national and comparative, when individuals or teams set out to examine particular issues or phenomena in two or more countries with the express intention of comparing their manifestations in different socio-cultural settings institutions, customs, traditions, value systems, lifestyles, language, thought patternsusing the same research instruments either to carry out secondary analysis of national data or to conduct new empirical work.

He noticed there was a difference in types of social welfare systems, and compared them based on their level of decommodification of social welfare goods. Another result of the greater emphasis on contextualisation in comparative studies is their increasingly interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary character, since a wide range of factors must be considered at the lowest possible level of disaggregation.

This would tend to ensure cross-national collaboration in the interpretation as well as the design of comparative research. It can be seen as a way of bridging the qualitative and quantitative research traditions. Cross-national projects give researchers a means of confronting findings in an attempt to identify and illuminate similarities and differences, not only in the observed characteristics of particular institutions, systems or practices, but also in the search for possible explanations in terms of national likeness and unlikeness.

When existing large-scale data are being re-analysed, the solution is not to disregard major demographic variables, since they may indicate greater intranational than international differences. Episteme, as a form and activity in the field of logos, marked the break of cognitive closure and advanced empirical inquiry, logical argumentation and the search for truth.

To avoid infringing well-established cultural norms in one country or another, substantial national variations in methods are sometimes tolerated that should render comparisons invalid. Comparing things is essential to basic scientific and philosophic inquiry, which has been done for a long time.

If these problems go unresolved, they are likely to affect the quality of the results of the whole project, since the researcher runs the risk of losing control over the construction and analysis of key variables.

Analysts of cross-national data should try to suspend initial belief in any major inter-country differences they discover. At the same time, government departments and research funding bodies have shown a growing interest in international comparisons, particularly in the social policy area, often as a means of evaluating the solutions adopted for dealing with common problems or to assess the transferability of policies between member states.

References and further reading Castles, F. The historical comparative research involves comparing different time-frames. Resist the temptation to compare too many countries at once. Quantitative analysis is much more frequently pursued than qualitative, and this is seen by the majority of comparative studies which use quantitative data.

One should routinely include methodological experiments in cross-national research. Spatially, cross-national comparisons are by far the most common, although comparisons within countries, contrasting different areas, cultures or governments also subsist and are very constructive, especially in a country like New Zealand, where policy often changes depending on which race it pertains to.

Even the definition of a country or society can be problematic, since there is no single identifiable, durable and relatively stable sociological unit equivalent to the total geographical territory of a nation.

Whatever the method adopted, the researcher needs to remain alert to the dangers of cultural interference, to ensure that discrepancies are not forgotten or ignored and to be wary of using what may be a sampling bias as an explanatory factor.

For researchers adopting a normative perspective, comparisons have served as a tool for developing classifications of social phenomena and for establishing whether shared phenomena can be explained by the same causes.

For many sociologists, comparisons have provided an analytical framework for examining and explaining social and cultural differences and specificity. Textbooks on this form of study were beginning to appear by the s, but its rise to extreme popularity began after World War II.

Problems in cross-national comparative research The shift in orientation towards a more interpretative, culture-bound approach means that linguistic and cultural factors, together with differences in research traditions and administrative structures cannot be ignored.

Since much of the international work carried out at European level is not strictly comparative at the design and data collection stages, the findings cannot then be compared systematically.

The approach may combine surveys, secondary analysis of national data, and also personal observation and an interpretation of the findings in relation to their wider social contexts.

Linguistic and cultural affinity is central to an understanding of why researchers from some national groups find it easier to work together and to reach agreement on research topics, design and instruments.

Rules of Comparative Research

In some areas, national records may be non-existent or may not go back very far. All papers will be subject to double-blind peer review. Yet, relatively few social scientists feel they are well equipped to conduct studies that seek to cross national boundaries, or to work in international teams.

He further theorized from this that decommodification was based on a combination of class coalitions and mobilization, and regime legacy.

The European Commission has established several large-scale programmes, and observatories and networks have been set up to monitor and report on social and economic developments in member states.The Cross-National Research Group was established in with the aim of providing a forum for discussion and exchange of ideas and experience between researchers from different social science disciplines engaged in cross-national comparative studies, for those planning to embark on cross-national projects and for policy-makers interested in.

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures.A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may not use the same categories, or define categories differently (for example by using different definitions of poverty.

The most cited papers from this title published in the last 3 years. Statistics are updated weekly using participating publisher data sourced exclusively from Crossref. Comparative Social Research. 75 likes.

Comparative research

Comparative Social Research aims at furthering the international orientation in the social sciences. It is. The yearbook Comparative Social Research aims at furthering the international orientation in the social sciences. Each volume is concentrated on a specific topic, mostly of substantive, but also of methodological character.

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. The term comparative method refers to a specific kind of comparison – the comparison of large macro-social units.

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